INTERVIEW: Peter Pilotto

Since 2007, the co-founders of Peter Pilotto (Peter Pilotto and Christopher de Vos) have been infusing their flair onto the British fashion scene. This season, the duo, who met at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, decided to shake things up a bit and showcase in Milan. Showing off the Italian craftsmanship and the exquisite textiles that went into the collection was just as much a priority as promoting the debut of their gender fluid looks, menswear ensembles, and accessories. 

Sofia Celeste: The collection is very relaxed. Is it because you feel this is what people want to wear now?

Christopher de Vos: We had never designed menswear before. The idea came when many of our girlfriends and boyfriends wanted to wear our clothes and there were few pieces in our collections that they both could wear.

Peter Pilotto: This conversation between girls and boys has been very mind-broadening for us. It has changed our approach to the female silhouettes. Now more than ever, as designers, you have to feel your collections. It really helped us to do better; we couldn’t wait to try our own pieces on.

SC: What made the two of you decide to show in Italy?

PP: Since we have been spending so much time in Italy, it was important for us to mirror that Italian sense of easiness, to be vibrant at the same time.

CDV: This is where the idea behind our transformable bag came from. You can play with it, choose whether to add more, or just wear them by themselves.

SC: Does your decision to show in Milan have to do with producing in Italy and being closer to Italian producers and textile makers?

PP:  Absolutely. Our suppliers have supported us so much and we have worked with amazing crafts people in this country. They were challenged and excited to try on new approaches.

SC: Is it a challenge to incorporate sustainable materials, in terms of price and quality?

CFV: All the suppliers are being put under a lot of pressure and they are being sort of forced towards that direction. We are part of this conversation, researching and developing new materials with the mills. 

SC: Does this collection incorporate sustainable fabrics?

PP: It does incorporate sustainable yarns. Knitwear was very big in this collection. What is fascinating about it is that you can develop it from scratch, choose what yarns, the colors, and how to mix them, and there is a lot of room for creation.

SC: There are some gender fluid items on the runway. Genderless is the new hot topic in fashion and culture. Do you think it is the new norm?

PP: As male designers designing for women, I feel it is very important for us to really feel the collection. We wanted to be able to make something we could wear ourselves. This  conversation between genders has been very important to us.

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