Paris Haute Couture Day One: Craftsmanship is Here to Stay

Nana Aganovich and Brooke Taylor have always excelled at showcasing otherworldly tailoring and craftsmanship that comes with a sense of poetry. In fact, the designer-duo's historical take on fashion is often expressed through a range of story-telling Haute Couture numbers that look like soft armors at times, and always impress through their ingenious craftsmanship. For this Fall 2019 season, their outstanding pieces included faceless silhouettes and sculpted styles which were quite impressive.



Aganovich Fall/Winter 2019 Couture show in Paris. Photo by Guillaume Roujas for NOWFASHION.


Later that day, Gabriele Moratti did what he does best for Redemption: creating a glam-rock infused Haute Couture collection. Somewhere in between baroque kitsch and glitzy jet set, Moratti provided a Fall 2019 Couture collection that was about all things sensual. Elegance, as per Moratti's definition, is an act of tension first and foremost, and as such the collection was seeking a harmonious compromise between the individualistic, deconstructed toughness of rock, and the opulence of glamorous and chic volumes and textures – two extremes that created an overall style which was firmly rooted in the present moment. 



Redemption Fall/Winter 2019 Couture show in Paris. Photo by Gio Staiano for NOWFASHION.


Maurizio Galante, for his part, took us all the way to Mexico this season. Paying homage to Mexican heritage and tradition, his religious-inspired silhouettes made an impression with their ingenuity and delicacy. That being said, this Haute Couture collection could certainly make a statement if exhibited, or worn on stage by a performing artist. It is difficult to imagine his pieces worn for other, more mundane occasions – and that is why Maurizio Galante's work is more in-tune with contemporary, refined craftsmanship than with pure fashion. 



Dress by Julie De Libran Fall/Winter 2019 Couture collection. Photos: Courtesy of PR.

The highlight of the day was definitely Julie de Libran's presentation of her first "Dress by Julie de Libran" collection in her home in the 6th arrondissement of Paris. Back when she was at the helm of Sonia Rykiel, Julie de Libran was able to convey the brand's spirit through sophisticated outfits that were freed from any constraints and came with a feminine and cheeky touch – and she kept this spirit alive for her first eponymous Haute Couture collection. However, she clearly parted ways with her previous creative direction and firmly established herself on her own, making a statement by launching a sustainable women's offering that is made to order only, numbered, and sold in a limited series, in order to eliminate wasteful overproduction. Her iridescent cocktail numbers unveiled an exquisitely precise craftsmanship created in collaboration with the best European mills and fabric suppliers – a first outing that has us longing for more. 


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